Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Rickey Henderson’

The Yankee offense has been both exciting and frustrating over the first 5 weeks of the season. Exciting, because they’re mashing home runs like it’s 1961 again. Frustrating, because they seem to leave runners on the bases every inning.

Three players have particularly drawn attention due to their offensive liabilities: Brett Gardner and two Yankee stalwarts, Derek Jeter and Jorge Posada. Of the three, Jeter is the one I’m least concerned about. First, if you look at him in terms of playing his position, he still rates as a top 5 shortstop. Yes, the numbers this season (.276 BA, .331 OBP) are far from the numbers Jeter has put up over his career. But if anyone honestly thought he was still a .320 hitter at age 37, they probably need a good psychiatrist. Here’s how Jeter stacks up with other AL shortstops right now:

Jeter is 2nd in batting average, 4th in on-base and 5th OPS. This list also represents only those AL shortstops who have amassed at least 100 plate appearances – something has to be said about durability. Note that none of the other players on the list have hit their 30th birthday yet. The other reason I’m not worried about Jeter is who knows how the chase for 3000 is affecting him? I doubt the added stress is helping. Let’s see how he does after hit #3000 is in the books before passing judgment.

We may be seeing all we’re ever going to see out of Gardner: a guy who can fly but lacks aggressiveness, both at the plate and on the basepaths. Working a count is one thing, but taking strike one on fastballs down the middle is ridiculous. As is his approach on the bases: great basestealers don’t read pitchers; they force pitchers to read them. Maybe the Yankees can hire Rickey Henderson as a special instructor and have Gardner hang out with him for a couple of weeks. If he doesn’t go completely insane, he may just pick up some of Rickey’s attitude.

That leaves us with Jorge. I’m afraid that Posada may be done and we’re seeing the death throes of a terrific career unfold before our eyes. I wouldn’t be so worried about him except for this: Posada has always demolished pitchers in April and May during his career; slumped badly in June and July and then picked it up as the playoffs approached. But this year’s numbers look nothing like a typical Jorge Posada April and May:

The drops from a typical Posada season to this one are alarmingly extreme: he strikes out more often and when he hits the ball, it’s without much authority. The result is the 130 point drop in batting average and 261 point decline in OPS. While he is homering more frequently, this looks more like the career of Rob Deer than Jorge Posada. I don’t think I’ve ever seen him look so lost at the plate, lunging at breaking pitches and unable to catch up to fastballs. Maybe the switch to full-time DH this year affects him more than he lets on. Regardless, I doubt either Joe Girardi or the front office will put up with this for too much longer, and I would hate to see one of the all-time greats go out on such a sorry note.

Read Full Post »

It’s not heaven, it’s Iowa.

Read Full Post »


ESPN New York released their “50 Greatest Yankees” list the other day. I can’t really argue too much with their list, although I probably would have swapped Thurman Munson (#12) and Bill Dickey (#10). Yes, I know Dickey is in the Hall of Fame and Munson isn’t. But it was Munson’s leadership, as much as anything else that returned the Yankees to their winning ways in the ’70s. And who knows what kind of numbers he would have put up if not for the plane crash?

Anyway, here’s their list. I’ve added in the dates they played for the Yanks, along with their position. An asterisk denotes a playing career interrupted by a military commitment; # denotes a Hall-of-Famer. Current players are in red type. Feel free to let us know how you feel about the list!

50. Mike Mussina (RHP, 2001-2008)

49. Bob Meusel (LF, 1920-1930)

48. Albert “Sparky” Lyle (LHP, 1972-1978)

47. Gil McDougald (IF, 1951-1960)

46. Jim “Catfish” Hunter (RHP, 1974-1978)#

45. David Cone (RHP, 1995-2000)

44. Roy White (LF, 1965-1979)

43. Hank Bauer (RF, 1948-1959)

42. Jack Chesbro (RHP, 1903-1909)#

41. Eddie Lopat (RHP, 1948-1955)

40. Rickey Henderson (1985-1989)#

39. Vic Raschi (RHP, 1946-1953)

38. Joe Gordon (2B, 1938-1946)*#

37. Tommy Henrich (RF, 1937-1950)*

36. Charlie “King Kong” Keller (LF, 1939-1949)*

35. Bobby Murcer (CF, 1969-1974, 1979-1983)

34. Spurgeon “Spud” Chandler (RHP, 1937-1947)

33. Willie Randolph (2B, 1976-1988)

32. Waite Hoyt (RHP, 1921-1929)#

31. Mel Stottlemyre (RHP, 1964-1974)

30. Paul O’Neill (RF, 1993-2001)

29. Graig Nettles (3B, 1973-1983)

28. Dave Winfield (OF, 1981-1990)#

27. Herb Pennock (LHP, 1923-1933)#

26. Allie “Superchief” Reynolds (RHP, 1947-1954)

25. Rich “Goose” Gossage (RHP, 1978-1983, 1989)#

24. Elston Howard (C, 1955-1967)

23. Earle Combs (CF, 1924-1935)#

22. Roger Maris (RF, 1960-1966)

21. Jorge Posada (C, 1995-present)

20. Phil Rizzuto (SS, 1941-1956)*#

19. Bernie Williams (CF, 1991-2006)

18. “Poosh ‘Em Up” Tony Lazzeri (2B, 1926-1937)#

17. Ron “Gator” Guidry (LHP, 1975-1988)

16. Andy Pettitte (LHP, 1995-2003, 2007-2010)

15. Reggie Jackson (RF, 1977-1981)#

14. Vernon “Lefty” Gomez (LHP, 1930-1942)#

13. Alex Rodriguez (3B, 2004-present)

12. Thurman Muson (C, 1969-1979)

11. Don Mattingly (1B, 1982-1995)

10. Bill Dickey (C, 1928-1946)#

9. Charles “Red” Ruffing (RHP, 1930-1942)#

8. Edward “Whitey” Ford (LHP, 1953-1967)*#

7. Derek Jeter (SS, 1995-present)

6. Lawrence “Yogi” Berra (C, 1946-1963)#

5. Mariano Rivera (RHP, 1995-present)

4. Mickey Mantle (CF, 1950-1968)#

3. “Joltin” Joe DiMaggio (CF, 1936-1951)*#

2. Lou “Iron Horse” Gehrig (1B, 1923-1939)#

1. George “Babe” Ruth (RF, 1920-1934)#

Read Full Post »

 

Derek Jeter has 2,892 career hits, which places him 108 hits from reaching 3,000. The New York Yankees have never had a player crack the 3,000-hit barrier in their uniform. That’s what makes this so special. They’ve had players in the past who reached the milestone (Dave Winfield, Rickey Henderson and Wade Boggs), but they weren’t career Yankees, and didn’t wear the pinstripes when they did it. Lou Gehrig was the closest player to 3,000, compiling 2,721 hits over 17 seasons.

When a player enters the 3,000 hit club, it’s thought of as a gauranteed spot in the Baseball Hall of Fame. The club has 27 members, but only 24 are eligible for the Hall of Fame right now. Pete Rose is ineligible for gambling on baseball games, while Craig Biggio and Rafael Palmeiro have been active within the past five seasons. Palmeiro will become eligible in 2011, while Biggio will have to wait until 2013. With Rafael being linked to steroids, it’s highly unlikely he will get in.

For Derek, it will just be another accolade to add to his résumé. He doesn’t need to break this barrier to be inducted into the Hall of Fame, but it’s just one of those very special moments in a player’s career. With only 34 games left in the season, Derek won’t be breaking the record this year.

The watch has already started, but it won’t end until early next season.

Read Full Post »

I got a little curious as to the top 10 Yankees lead off hitters who started the game batting first with atleast 1 plate appearance. Here is what Baseball-Reference has told me:
Rk Player AB H HR RBI BB SO BA OPS
1 Earle Combs 4496 1460 46 486 542 209 .325 .862
2 Horace Clarke 4271 1084 24 261 318 321 .254 .617
3 Willie Randolph 3152 878 20 235 506 231 .279 .736
4 Frankie Crosetti 2856 718 50 262 372 395 .251 .719
5 Derek Jeter 2478 794 73 277 272 407 .320 .863
6 Rickey Henderson 2278 657 77 252 403 277 .288 .851
7 Chuck Knoblauch 2102 571 49 200 259 243 .272 .767
8 Whitey Witt 1716 513 11 127 198 90 .299 .745
9 Hank Bauer 1677 461 75 222 173 215 .275 .819
10 Tony Kubek 1754 459 31 145 84 183 .262 .669
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 3/26/2010.

Outside of Earle Combs, no other player on that list has a batting average over .300 other than El Capitan, Derek Jeter. However, Jeter has a higher OPS. Interesting to see Rickey Henderson as compared to Jeter. For your information, Johnny Damon came in at number 11.

Read Full Post »

Think of all the Yankees history and name off the top 5 players that come to mind. Surely the first name out of anyone’s mouth is Babe Ruth, though after that, the list is slightly up for debate. In no order I have Gehrig, Mantle, DiMaggio and Berra. However, I and most Yankees fans soon will likely have Derek Jeter in that list. It may sound a little like heresy, but it is true. For the sake of argument, I am assuming that Derek will play 4 more  years before retiring, if not more.

At this moment, Derek is in the top 5, or in striking distance, of most of the major offensive categories as a Yankee. If Derek plays another 4 seasons (which seems to be what most Yankees bloggers are guessing) and performing along with his career averages, Derek, barring any injuries, will likely lead the Yankees in the following categories: Games Played, At Bats, Runs, Hits, Doubles, Total Plate Appearances, Stolen Bases and likely will end with close to 5,000 total bases. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Today is a glorious day for those who celebrate Christmas and to those who don’t, I hope your holidays are just as warm. Today generally is a good day, unless your birthday is today or within a week timespan of this day, then you’re screwed. Sorry :(

51 years ago the greatest of all time Rickey Henderson was born.

However, 20 years ago today Billy Martin passed away.

True Fact: Billy Martin is buried 150 feet away from Babe Ruth.

Either way, today is a wonderful day to those that celebrate it, so to you I say Merry Christmas, to the rest I say Happy Holidays and to Costanza’s, Happy Festivus!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: