Advertisements
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Philadelphia Phillies’

Masahiro Tanaka

Masahiro Tanaka

New York Yankees (4-4) vs Philadelphia Phillies (1-6)

Pitching Matchup:

RHP Masahiro Tanaka (0-0, 0.00) vs RHP Kyle Kendrick (0-0, 13.50)

Lineup

Gardner LF
Jeter SS
Teixeira 1B
Beltran RF
McCann C
Soriano DH
Johnson 3B
Roberts 2B
Williams CF

————

The game will take place at Bright House Field in Clearwater, Florida.  It’s slated to start at 2:30PM ET (delayed due to rain). The game will be televised on the MLB Network.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Ubaldo Jimenez

Some things are a given in life. The sun rises in the east. Commuter trains in New York are overstuffed and never run on time. The Yankees always make a trade in July.

Only, this year that last one might not happen.

It’s not for lack of need. The starting line-up is solid and the bench features guys who could start for better than half the teams in baseball. But the pitching staff, both in the rotation and the bullpen, is loaded with question marks. CC Sabathia is an unqualified ace; Mariano Rivera remains the king of closers and David Robertson has turned into one of the game’s most reliable set-up men. But the rest of the staff doesn’t inspire confidence on a daily basis.

The Yankees are plagued by the fact that among the presumed LCS teams, they’re the only team without a bona-fide number 2 starter. The Red Sox feature Jon Lester and Josh Beckett. The Phillies send Roy Halladay
and Cliff Lee. The Giants have Tim Lincecum and Matt Cain. The Yankees keep hoping that AJ Burnett will be that number two guy – but after 2 ½ seasons of watching him implode at the most inopportune times, I can’t think of anyone who truly thinks he is. Bartolo Colon, based on his performance this year (7-6, 3.29 ERA, 8K/9) is probably the current #2, but he’s already thrown more innings than over the past 4 seasons combined and you have to worry about how much longer he can continue. Freddy Garcia keeps pulling magic acts on the mound, but his xFIP is nearly a half-run higher than his ERA; you get the feeling that sooner or later his luck is going to run out. Phil Hughes exploded on the scene in the first half of 2010, but since then he’s been less than a pedestrian pitcher (7-7, 5.76 ERA). Ivan Nova was sent back the minors earlier and despite showing signs of improvement when he was with the big club, he is nowhere near being a number two starter.

Likewise, the bullpen has a few holes. Rafael Soriano was brought in to be the primary set-up man, but he’s spent most of the season on the DL and was largely ineffective before getting hurt. Boone Logan is the supposed lefty specialist, but left handers are tuning him up to a 138 OPS+. While Cory Wade and Luis Ayala have been reasonably pleasant surprises, neither has experienced this level of success before. And heaven help us all if the abysmal Sergio Mitre is reactivated and added to the post-season roster.

So, like I said, the Yankees certainly have needs. The problem is there doesn’t seem to be anyone available in the trade market that can fill those needs. There’s been a lot of discussion regarding Ubaldo Jimenez, but the Rockies
asking price (3 or 4 of the Yanks blue chip prospects) is insane. Jimenez had a terrific first half of 2010. Otherwise, he’s a sub-.500 pitcher with a career ERA of 3.87 – while pitching in the offensively challenged NL West. If Brian Cashman adds him at tomorrow’s deadline, I’ll be underwhelmed. The other starters rumored to be on the market also aren’t overly impressive. They range from the oft-injured Erik Bedard to the recalcitrant Hiroki Kuroda
to baseball’s version of a spoiled two-year old, Carlos Zambrano. In short, barring some sort of unexpected blockbuster, there simply isn’t anyone available who provides an upgrade over what the Yanks currently have on hand.

In terms of bullpen help, the Yanks are certainly looking for a left hander – but good luck finding anyone. The Orioles probably want to rid themselves of Mike Gonzales and his bloated contract, but he has had zero success in the AL. The A’s might be willing to part with Brian Fuentes, but I can’t imagine the Yankees assuming around $8.5 million in contract for a guy who has actually been worse against lefties than Logan. The only other name I’ve seen available is the Cubs John Grabow. Like Fuentes and Gonzales, he’s been more piñata than pitcher.

So, there you have it. Unlike past deadlines, this one is looking pretty quiet for the Yankee front office.

Read Full Post »

Yesterday, I reviewed the Baby Bomber’s pitchers and catchers and evaluated their chances of making the opening day roster. Today it’s time for the infielders and outfielders. Unlike the wealth of talent behind the dish and on the rubber, there isn’t any outstanding talent in these spots, but there are some intriguing guys who might help out somewhere along the line.

Infielders – Let’s face it. As fans, we don’t want another season of Ramiro Pena’s average glove and Mario Mendoza bat. And while Kevin Russo seems like a nice kid, he wasn’t any better. Who might replace him?

Eduardo Nunez: If any of the young infielders in camp have a sincere chance of unseating Pena, this is the guy. He continues to hit decently, showing some line-drive power and decent speed. He isn’t the smoothest guy in the field, but he isn’t a liability, either. Besides, he is the guy who was supposed to replace Derek Jeter had Armageddon come to the Bronx this past winter.

Eduardo Nunez

Eduardo Nunez

Reegie Corona: Quite frankly, I don’t see much difference between Corona and Pena. Both of them get the bat knocked out of their hands by anyone who throws harder than 85mph. Both are competent, but not other-worldly, fielders. He looks targeted for AAA Scranton and will likely be first guy up should Jeter or Robbie Cano get injured.

Brandon Laird: The Yankees are sending the natural 3B to AAA Scranton to learn a “super-utility role” – 3B, 1B, RF, LF. It makes sense since both 1B and 3B are sewed up for the next few years. And I doubt the front office wants to keep bringing in retreads for reserve RH bench spots, when there may well be a better option in the high minors.

Jorge Vazquez: Look, when you’re 29 and never been on a major league roster, you might want to start thinking about taking the Crash Davis route. Vazquez possesses a slider speed bat but can’t hit breaking balls. He plays the corner spots, but is known in the minors as a defensive liability at third and barely adequate at first. He does have power and displayed it against other minor leaguers early in camp. He’s a classic “AAAA” player – too good for AAA, but will get eaten alive in MLB.

Outfielders – Fortunately, the Yanks don’t really need anything other than competent bench players here, because this is easily the most underwhelming part of the minor league system.

Justin Maxwell: Ok, so he isn’t exactly a rookie, with 122 major league appearances over three seasons. But the Nationals aren’t exactly a MLB club, either. He has a career ML slash line of .201/.319/.379 with a .698 OPS. What he brings to the table is decent speed, the ability to play all 3 OF positions adequately and the high expectations from his college career at Maryland. Hopefully, a full season at AAA (something he never got from Washington) will help him rediscover the form that made him a 1st round pick.

Colin Curtis: Yankee fans got a glimpse of Curtis last year, when he appeared in 31 games for the Bombers. He didn’t really impress, putting up a .538 OPS in 64 plate appearances. (Although he did hit a memorable homer against the Angels). The former Arizona State standout may have reached his limit. If so, that would be a shame because he certainly has a compelling back story.

Greg Golson: Yet another player that fans have seen in Pinstripes, the 25 year old Golson also saw MLB time while with the Phillies and Rangers. He has become a speedy defensive specialist, and his arm proved invaluable in a key game against the Rays last year. Still, he needs to do better than his career MiLB slash line of .263/.309/.398 if he wants to stick with the big club.

Melky Mesa

Melky Mesa: Another long shot, the 24 year old Mesa has played 5 seasons of MiLB and never reached AA. He does have speed and power but his strikeout percentage (.319) is higher than his on base percentage (.307), never a good sign. I hope he figures it out, since he is the prototypical 5 tool player. The Yanks are taking something of a chance, assigning him to AAA to start the season and skipping AA entirely.

Jordan Parraz: In 7 minor league seasons, the 26 year old former Astros and Royals farmhand has compiled a MiLB slash line of .289/.376/.438, which is decent. But he may be another case of the classic “AAAA” player, since he has yet to see the majors despite an ability to play all three OF spots and good peripherals in the minors.

Read Full Post »

New York Yankees Relief Pitcher Joba Chamberlain Reaches For A High Throw From First Baseman Eric Chavez, Not Shown,New York Yankees (8-12-3) vs Philadelphia Phillies (15-8)

Pitching Matchup:

LHP CC Sabathia (0-0, 4.66) vs RHP Joe Blanton (1-0, 3.45)

Lineup

Gardner LF
Jeter SS
Teixeira 1B
Rodriguez DH
Cano 2B
Swisher RF
Granderson CF
Chavez 3B
Martin C

The game will take place at Brighthouse Networks Field in Clearwater, Fla.  It’s slated to start at 1:05PM ET. The game will be on the MLB Network (delay). (more…)

Read Full Post »

New York Yankees (0-1) vs Philadelphia Phillies (1-0)

Pitching Matchup:

RHP  Ivan Nova (0-0, 0.00) vs RHP  Joe Blanton (0-0, 0.00)

Lineup

Gardner LF
Swisher RF
Granderson CF
Posada DH
Chavez 1B
Montero C
Nunez 2B
Laird 3B
Pena SS

The game will take place at Bright House Networks Field in Clearwater, Florida.  It’s slated to start at 1:05PM ET. The game is being televised on the YES Network.

Read Full Post »

New York Yankees Pitcher Bartolo Colon RunsPhiladelphia Phillies (0-0) vs New York Yankees (0-0)

Pitching Matchup:

RHP Bartolo Colon (0-0, 0.00) vs LHP Cole Hamels (0-0, 0.00)

Lineup

Jeter SS
Swisher RF
Teixeira 1b
Rodriguez 3b
Cano 2b
Posada DH
Granderson CF
Cervelli C
Gardner LF

The game will take place at George M. Steinbrenner Field in Tampa, Florida.  It’s slated to start at 1:05PM ET. The game is being televised on the YES & MLB Networks. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Courtesy: NY Daily News

Yesterday, the Yankees finally made a splash in the free-agent market, signing the best reliever on the market in Rafael Soriano. Signing the all-star closer definitely takes care of the 8th inning spot, so we can cross that off the list of needs heading into 2011. If the contract runs full term, then the Yankees have also addressed the question of who takes over for Mariano Rivera when the future Hall of Famer decides to retire. In all, I like the signing; although the contract is probably a bit too player friendly.

But the signing has opened up a whole new line of questions about the team, Brian Cashman and who is really running the show. Buster Olney tweeted the question that is running through quite a few minds this morning:

“Looks like there was a split in Yankees’ org. over this — since it took place just days after Cashman said he wouldn’t give up No. 1 pick.”

Let’s take a look at the other reasons many are wondering who actually pulled the trigger on the deal.

  1. The contract is extremely player friendly. Not only does it make Soriano the 3rd highest paid reliever in MLB (behind Mo and Francisco Cordero), it gives him the option to opt out after years 1 and 2. In other words, this could be a 1 year deal for $10M, a 2 year deal for $22M or a 3 year deal for $35M. Given Cashman’s known reluctance to pay out big dollars to relievers, his reluctance to spend on anyone this winter and his absolute abhorrence to player friendly contracts (see Jeter, Derek or Rodriguez, Alex), you have to wonder why he would throw that kind of money or those terms at Soriano.
  2. The Yankees have taken a beating in the tabloids for, well, basically standing pat this off-season. Cashman seemed content to avoid signing anyone of consequence, even as the Red Sox, Orioles, Phillies and even the Nationals have gone all-out to improve their teams. Despite the team’s obvious need for starting pitching, he never made a play for Zach Greinke and according to published statements, quickly gave up on acquiring Matt Garza. Cashman may be made of teflon in terms of criticism, but a certain member of the ownership group isn’t.
  3. Cashman’s history in the FA market is to make runs at the consensus best player available (like CC Sabathia or Mark Teixeira) or try to find diamonds in the rough (Nick Johnson, Marcus Thames from last season). He doesn’t really have a history of targeting a big name to fill a limited role.
  4. Soriano’s agent is Scott Boras. Like most GM’s, Cashman normally treats Boras – and his clients – as if they have a combination of leprosy and bubonic plague. That he would suddenly, in less than week’s time, go from “we’re not surrendering a 1st round pick” to handing out a player friendly contract to Boras is really hard to fathom.

In other words, this looks a lot more like Hank Steinbrenner pulled the trigger on this deal than Cashman. Hank is like his father in many ways: not afraid of dealing with Boras, willing to hand out player-friendly contracts and hates the Yanks being upstaged by anyone.

So, here’s the question of the day: who do you think was most responsible for signing Rafael Soriano, and what do you think it means for the future of the front office? Let us know!

Read Full Post »

I’m following up on Kevin’s post from last night: my biggest pet peeve is #22: specifically, hearing fans from “small market” teams complain that they can’t compete with the Yankees because they’ll never have the similar payrolls. (I don’t understand the fuss over #23, girls accepting marriage proposals. But then, I’m an old-fashioned romantic).

Just typing that nonsense about “competing” made my blood start to boil. There are two problems with that entire line of reasoning: (1) baseball is about competition; not just on the field but between the front offices and (2) there are plenty of teams out there who do not have the Yankees financial resources but manage to field playoff-caliber squads every year.

Minnesota and Philadelphia are great examples of teams that compete for the pennant, despite limited resources. Last time I checked, San Diego has an excellent shot to return to the fall classic this year. The Marlins, Rockies and Rays all have legitimate chances at the postseason. And let’s not forget the ultimate in small-market success: the Braves will finish above .500 for the 19th consecutive season, a stretch unmatched by any team in baseball (including the Yankees).

So, if you’re a disheartened Pirates or Royals fan, turn to your teams’ ownerships and ask them why they refuse to put the money they get from MLB back into players. (Hey, the Pirates reported a $20.4 million disbursement to the ownership group last year. Sure glad they earned it.) Stop complaining about the Yankees and start complaining about your team’s inept front offices.

Read Full Post »

If you’re a Major League Baseball fan, you probably fall on either one of two sides of the almighty equation: love the Yankees or hate the Yankees. Either way, it’s inevitable – the New York Yankees own you. From a historic perspective, much of what we appreciate or sometimes abhor about the sport was started or at least perpetuated by the Bombers. You think Damon jumping ship broke Boston’s heart? Well, New York started the trend of buying the best talent long, long before then. Since 1918 when Babe Ruth was purchased by the Yankees, shelling out dollars for ability has been New York’s forte. The club is also arguably responsible for the overall popularity on the sport. Appearing in 40 World Series, winning 27 and absolutely dominating the landscape in the East since the 1920s, the Yankees have constructed an empire that, unlike others throughout history, refuses to collapse.

After winning their 27th title last year, the Yankees started the 2010 MLB season as favorites to repeat. Even though they had to let some long-time favorites go, like Matsui and Damon, they’ve only tightened up and have walloped the competition for the first half of the season, and now stand at 57-33, 2 games out in front of Tampa Bay and 5.5 in front of their rival Red Sox. The AL East has been the Yankees’ biggest competition thus far. Not that the Central and West are AAA clubs, to be sure, but the top three records in the AL belong to the Eastern clubs – Yankees, Rays, Red Sox. And with New York’s ability to fend off two 50-win clubs, their odds for repeating as World Series champs have gone down tremendously since the season began. Not every sports fan is a gambler. And certainly not every gambler is a sports fan. But the MLB Playoffs and the World Series race is absolutely huge business for the betting world. Vegas, Internet sports books, AC – it doesn’t matter where. Over a billion dollars is placed down on one WS game. The goal of the gambler, obviously, is to secure a nice payday. The goal of the odds maker is to ensure action plays and that favorites winning won’t break the bank. Everyone loves an underdog, true – but they bet on what they feel to be the “sure thing,” by and large. This has caused odds makers to go into risk management mode over the Yankees’ impressive baseball play.

When you’re hunting for online casino bonuses, stop by the sports betting section and check out the Yankees odds. Normally, a team with 50-plus wins at this juncture would pull in around 15:1. If they’re good and not just hot, you could drop that to 10:1. If they’re previous champions, like the Phillies of 08, you could hope for 8-5:1 with the makers not too worried about covering their hind ends at this point. But the so-called experts of the betting world understand exactly what they’re seeing with New York. Only 90 games into the regular season, the Yankees are standing well ahead of their closet betting competition, the Tampa Bay Rays (7:1), at an unmatched 3:1. It’s clear how sports books expect the scenario to unfold in the coming months. With revitalized pitching, hot bats at the plate, and a probable wave of pride-filled emotion due to the death of Steinbrenner to carry them through the stretch, it’s evident that the Yankees have the potential to bowl through the playoffs on their way to their 41st World Series appearance and most likely their 28th title.

Even everyday gamblers tinkering with their online slot machines are likely to throw a few dollars down on a New York win. If it happened at 8:1, 100 bucks turns into 800 – and multiplying that by a few thousand means sports books take a huge hit. But having 100 turn to 300—and possibly significantly less if odds adjust even lower—provides more breathing room for online and on-location bookies. In other words, the New York Yankees not only have their MLB competition shaking in their boots, but odds makers are also bowing down and showing due reverence to the pin-striped legends of the diamond. Anything can happen in Major League Baseball. The Yankees winning another World Series is far from a foregone conclusion. But the jury is in. Odds makers certainly agree that the Yankees are on their way.

Read Full Post »

Yesterday, I posted this about Curtis Granderson‘s ineffectiveness hitting against left-handed pitching. One of the potential solutions I tossed out there was trading for Jayson Werth, who is rumored to be on the trading block.

Lo and behold, today Buster Olney tweeted that the Phillies are aggressively marketing Werth and looking for a starting pitcher who they can slot in as their #2 or #3 guy. Buster may work for that other Evil Empire (ESPN), but his rumor reports are usually accurate. This sets up two potentially block-buster deals, if the Yanks are willing to swing for the fences. This particularly holds true as Werth has long been mentioned to be on the Yankees off-season short list of potential free agent signings.

The key to the whole thing is, in my opinion, the other probable free agent that is supposedly a foregone conclusion to sign with the team this coming off season. You know – a certain left handed starter currently wearing the Seattle Mariners colors – Cliff Lee. Here’s how I see it potentially playing out:

The Mariners are reputed to be looking for a young catcher with a major-league ready bat, which is why the dominant trade rumor has centered on the Twins and their prospect Wilson Ramos. (Ramos is blocked by Joe Mauer). However, the Yanks have two pretty good catching prospects, one of whom is considered to be a potential 25 HR/100 RBI type hitter in Jesus Montero. The other is Austin Romine, whose offensive skills aren’t as good as Montero but is much better defensively. I know this is sacrilege among most Yankees fans, but I’d much rather see Romine become Jorge Posada’s heir, but regardless, either of them makes an interesting component to pry Lee from the Mariners. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Phillies (33-30) at Yankees (41-24)

Pitching Matchup 

LHP Andy Pettitte (8-1, 2.46) vs RHP Kyle Kendrick (3-2, 4.80)

Lineup 

Jeter SS
Granderson CF
Teixeira 1B
Rodriguez DH
Cano 2B
Swisher RF
Gardner LF
Cervelli C
Pena 3B (more…)

Read Full Post »

Phillies (32-29) at Yankees (40-23)

Pitching Matchup 

LHP C.C. Sabathia (6-3, 4.01) vs RHP Roy Halladay (8-4, 1.96)

Lineup 

Jeter SS
Granderson CF
Teixeira 1B
Cano 2B
Swisher RF
Posada DH
Gardner LF
Cervelli C
Pena 3B (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: