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Masahiro Tanaka

Masahiro Tanaka

Pitcher Masahiro Tanaka is the seventh Japanese player to be part of the New York Yankees.

Before signing him, the Yankees were in the ninth place in the odds lists for winning the 2014 World Series. The favorites to win this season are Los Angeles Dodgers. You can check your favorite team’s place in SportsBettingDime.com.

Tanaka signed a seven-year $ 155 million contract, becoming the fifth Asian pitcher to join New York. The Yankees will have two Japanese in the rotation for next season, with Tanaka and veteran Hiroki Kuroda. The 25-year-old ended last season with a 24-0 record playing for the Rakuten Golden Eagles, with a 1.27 ERA. In 175 games, the Japanese threw 53 complete games with 18 shutouts and 1,238 strikeouts.

The team led by Joe Girardi has had a good experience with Japanese players (Ichiro Suzuki and Hideki Matsui), but none has excelled on the mound. The first Japanese pitcher to reach the Yankees was Hideki Irabu in 1997, who won two World Series with the team but did not take part in any game. Irabu finished with 27 wins and 24 losses in two years in New York, with a 3.31 ERA. He allowed 396 hits and 165 runs while striking out 317 rivals.

Kei Igawa was signed in 2007 and stayed only two seasons with the team. The former Hanshin Tigers player started 13 games and finished with a 2-4 record with a 6.66 ERA. He allowed 89 hits, 54 runs and 15 home runs. Due to his low-level of play, the team sent him to AAA team and tried to trade him to another squad in Japan.

Ryota Igarashi, who arrived from the Toronto Blue Jays, was the third Japanese pitcher to try his luck with the Yankees. He joined the team in 2012, but had only two appearances, pitching three innings with four hits and four runs.

After four seasons with the Los Angeles Dodgers, Kuroda signed a one-year contract with New York in January 2012 and achieved a 16-11 mark. Thanks to his good numbers he stayed for another season, but only got 11 wins and closed with seven losses in his last 10 appearances.

Next season, Tanaka will be the ninth Japanese active player in the MLB, but the Yankees expect him to become the biggest star of the Rising Sun country to return to the playoffs and aspire to another World Series title.

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Thanks to Flip Flop Fly Ball for this wonderful infographic. It’s pretty self-explanatory.

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Jorge Posada’s retirement got me looking at the Yankees all-time catcher’s statistics. One thing that stands out in particular is Posada’s on base percentage, which is second only to Bill Dickey, which is 101 points above his career average. Also, each of these catchers played their entire career with the Yanks except a few at-bats for Berra with the Mets and Howard’s last two seasons were with Boston.

Accolades of Note:

All of them have their number retired with the Yankees.

Yogi Berra:  10 WS rings, 3 time MVP, HOF and did it all while standing 5’7” tall

Jorge Posada: 5 WS rings, 5 time All-Star

Bill Dickey: 7 WS rings, 11 time All-Star

Elston Howard: 1st African American player on NYY, 1963 MVP, 9 time All-Star, 4 WS rings

Thurman Munson: Captain, 2 WS rings, 1973 ROY, 1976 MVP

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Last night Granderson hit 2 more home runs, bringing his total to 38. He was 3 for 5 with 4 rbis and 2 runs scored.

Granderson is on pace for 47 homers and 132 rbis.

Current Stats: HR 38 – RBI 107 – AVG .278 – SB 24

Closer Look: 21/38 hrs have been solo, .268 avg with RISP, 138 Strikeouts


PS: Kevin hasn’t had power since Saturday, so he has been unable to update things.

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The Yankee offense has been both exciting and frustrating over the first 5 weeks of the season. Exciting, because they’re mashing home runs like it’s 1961 again. Frustrating, because they seem to leave runners on the bases every inning.

Three players have particularly drawn attention due to their offensive liabilities: Brett Gardner and two Yankee stalwarts, Derek Jeter and Jorge Posada. Of the three, Jeter is the one I’m least concerned about. First, if you look at him in terms of playing his position, he still rates as a top 5 shortstop. Yes, the numbers this season (.276 BA, .331 OBP) are far from the numbers Jeter has put up over his career. But if anyone honestly thought he was still a .320 hitter at age 37, they probably need a good psychiatrist. Here’s how Jeter stacks up with other AL shortstops right now:

Jeter is 2nd in batting average, 4th in on-base and 5th OPS. This list also represents only those AL shortstops who have amassed at least 100 plate appearances – something has to be said about durability. Note that none of the other players on the list have hit their 30th birthday yet. The other reason I’m not worried about Jeter is who knows how the chase for 3000 is affecting him? I doubt the added stress is helping. Let’s see how he does after hit #3000 is in the books before passing judgment.

We may be seeing all we’re ever going to see out of Gardner: a guy who can fly but lacks aggressiveness, both at the plate and on the basepaths. Working a count is one thing, but taking strike one on fastballs down the middle is ridiculous. As is his approach on the bases: great basestealers don’t read pitchers; they force pitchers to read them. Maybe the Yankees can hire Rickey Henderson as a special instructor and have Gardner hang out with him for a couple of weeks. If he doesn’t go completely insane, he may just pick up some of Rickey’s attitude.

That leaves us with Jorge. I’m afraid that Posada may be done and we’re seeing the death throes of a terrific career unfold before our eyes. I wouldn’t be so worried about him except for this: Posada has always demolished pitchers in April and May during his career; slumped badly in June and July and then picked it up as the playoffs approached. But this year’s numbers look nothing like a typical Jorge Posada April and May:

The drops from a typical Posada season to this one are alarmingly extreme: he strikes out more often and when he hits the ball, it’s without much authority. The result is the 130 point drop in batting average and 261 point decline in OPS. While he is homering more frequently, this looks more like the career of Rob Deer than Jorge Posada. I don’t think I’ve ever seen him look so lost at the plate, lunging at breaking pitches and unable to catch up to fastballs. Maybe the switch to full-time DH this year affects him more than he lets on. Regardless, I doubt either Joe Girardi or the front office will put up with this for too much longer, and I would hate to see one of the all-time greats go out on such a sorry note.

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I’ve been hearing a lot of rumbling from some folks about the lack of offense during Spring Training. Folks, it’s only Spring Training. What’s more, it’s early in Spring Training. If you’re thinking you’ll be seeing this much of Ramiro Pena come the regular season, then you are probably a lost cause. Of course, if you also think this is really a preview of things to come, then I suppose we should fit Ivan Nova for a Cy Young trophy now, as he’d have the most incredible season in history. For that matter, unheralded Jorge Vazquez would slam 72 homers (career high in MiLB: 33, 5 years ago). In other words, you can’t place any faith in Spring Training statistics. Guys don’t play complete games, the level of competition is all over the place and both managers and players are trying different things to see how they work. But in case you’re the type who does place a misguided faith in the numbers, consider this: so far, the nine guys who comprise the Yankee’s starting line-up have accounted for just 39% of the team’s plate appearances this spring. As a group they’ve combined for an .282 batting average and slugged their way to an .831 OPS. That is otherworldly production. Here’s the breakdown: 

ST Stats through March 13, 2011

I’ll take this level of production over 162 games, along with Nova’s Cy Young. :)

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This has been a fun week for the LeBron James detractors as “LeBrick” and “LeFraud” tweets filled my timeline with the Heat losing 3 close games all ending on missed 3 point attempts by the “King” in the final seconds. This recent string of poor end game play has further fueled the perception that LeBron James is un-clutch, a choker, isn’t a “closer” (a popular, yet maddening term used by many basketball talking heads) and above all comes up small in the biggest situations. Couple the undeserved clutch reputation, with the ill-conceived off court “Decision” where he infamously took his talents to South Beach, and throw in the blame of playoff failures heaped solely on him and you have…Pre-2009 Alex Rodriguez.

While the impact an NBA superstar can have on a game is much greater then that of any position player in baseball, many of the terms used to describe LeBron were also previously used by people who disliked ARod, including many Yankee haters and even Yankee fans (i.e. the Jeter “zealots” and members of the Cody Ransom fan club). There is no question both James and ARod’s off-field actions (e.g. 2007 World series opt out, PED usage, aforementioned Decision, the silly “What should I do?” commercials) have turned fans to root against them and if you feel that way, that’s fine. I get it…most of us need a heel to root against, especially if our team isn’t playing, that’s part of what makes sports enjoyable. What I do have an issue with is when the dislike of a player completely warps the view of their performance. Think back to ARod:

  • He was given the goat horns for the epic 2004 collapse, but if Mo closes Game 4 or Gordon doesn’t implode in Game 5, ARod probably wins the ALCS MVP
  • As he struggled in the ’05 and ‘06 ALDS (a grand total of 9 games), ARod detractors and many Yankees fans began to dismiss his previous playoff statistics as a Mariner and even his great series versus the Twins in ’04 because he “wasn’t a Yankee” and because the “ALDS doesn’t matter because the Yankees are only about winning the World Series…blah blah blah”
  • In 2007 despite having a historic MVP regular season and carrying the Yankees to the playoffs, his 4 for 17 postseason was the lead story for Yankees failures (instead of the two game C-M Wang meltdown)
  • Even his manager fell prey to the madness dropping him to 8th in the lineup in a playoff game (Could you imagine Spoelstra or even Pat Riley making LeBron come off the bench in a deciding playoff game?)

All the walk-off homeruns, game-winning hits and MVP awards he had during those years were minimized, because “A-Fraud couldn’t get it done when it mattered most.” Never mind that the Yankees starting pitching was the main culprit in those playoff series losses, it was ALL AROD’s FAULT. Heck even players from other teams would chime in and take shots at ARod as did Torre in his book. Thankfully 2009 happened, silencing most of the critics.

LeBron finds himself today, were ARod was 2 years ago. A HOF player, who is hated and disliked by most fans/media, resulting in a skewed analysis of his play. Under this pretense, Regular season MVP awards are trivialized. Stellar post-season performance is conveniently forgotten (Regular season: 27.7ppg-7.1rpg-7.0apg, Postseason: 29.3ppg-8.4rpg-7.3apg). “Clutch” shots and “closing out” games (LeBron has made four game-winning shots in the playoffs and rates well statistically in clutch situations as of 2009) are swept under the rug. The fact that until this season, his supporting cast has been mediocre to poor (see the Cavs this season without him), will also be nothing more then a mere footnote for the LeBrick backers.

The perception won’t change until LeBron wins a ring. Until then he’ll have to hear about how he doesn’t have the clutch gene (Ian O’Connor’d: Yes Jeter was born with this gene and ARod wasn’t) and how he’s afraid to take and make big shots. ARod finally broke through and LeBron will one day as well. On that night I hope LeBron hooks up with ARod once again this time to get wasted on championship champagne. That is one scene I want the A-Fraud/LeFraud supporters to all be witnesses too.

Follow me on Twitter: @eddieperez23

(This blog post was also used as a guest post on http://www.yankeeanalysts.com/)

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We all know that Derek Jeter is going to be the first Yankee to hit 3,000 hits as long as he stays healthy this year. What many people don’t know is that he is 52 walks away from 1,000 total walks. In his 15 full seasons he has failed to walk 52 or more only 3 times (’96,’03,’04), so it’s almost a lock for him to hit 1,000 walks in 2011. At this point in history, there are only 20 other people who have done this (see below for the table for those people). Pretty good company, eh?

Player H BB Age G
Pete Rose 4256 1566 22-45 3562
Ty Cobb 4189 1249 18-41 3034
Hank Aaron 3771 1402 20-42 3298
Stan Musial 3630 1599 20-42 3026
Tris Speaker 3514 1381 19-40 2789
Carl Yastrzemski 3419 1845 21-43 3308
Paul Molitor 3319 1094 21-41 2683
Eddie Collins 3315 1499 19-43 2826
Willie Mays 3283 1464 20-42 2992
Eddie Murray 3255 1333 21-41 3026
Cal Ripken 3184 1129 20-40 3001
George Brett 3154 1096 20-40 2707
Paul Waner 3152 1091 23-42 2549
Dave Winfield 3110 1216 21-43 2973
Craig Biggio 3060 1160 22-41 2850
Rickey Henderson 3055 2190 20-44 3081
Rod Carew 3053 1018 21-39 2469
Rafael Palmeiro 3020 1353 21-40 2831
Wade Boggs 3010 1412 24-41 2440
Al Kaline 3007 1277 18-39 2834
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 1/26/2011.

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With the recent acquisition of Rafael Soriano, the seemingly ageless question of whether Joba Chamberlain should be moved back into the starting rotation has resurfaced. It’s a question that has plagued the Yankees ever since Joba exploded on the scene as Mariano’s set-up man in the second half of the 2007 season.

Really, nobody thought the question would be a topic of discussion heading into this season. Joba was given a shot at the #5 spot last spring and lost to Phil Hughes. Going into this offseason, he seemed destined to be given a legitimate chance at earning the 8th inning role, despite his erratic pitching in 2010. After all, the Yankees were the consensus pick to land Cliff LeeAndy Pettitte wasn’t supposed to semi-retire. There wasn’t any room for Joba in the rotation and 8th inning duties looked to be a battle between him and David Robertson.

My, what a difference a few months and one type A free agent signing can bring. Now the 8th inning role is filled and the 7th inning features Joba, Robertson, Boone Logan and Pedro Feliciano, while the rotation features world-beaters Ivan Nova and Sergio Mitre. Given the way the pitching staff has suddenly been reshuffled, it’s no wonder the question of Joba’s proper role has resurfaced.

There are plenty of statistical reasons for making Joba a starter again. Mike Axisa of RAB has the usual arguments listed here. There’s also another reason moving Joba to the rotation makes sense: as currently constucted, the ‘pen doesn’t have a long man – the guy you bring in when the starter blows up in the 3rd or 4th inning. Last year, that role was filled by Mitre and Chad Gaudin. The rotation as currently set, with three guys who have a history of falling apart early in starts (not only Nova and Mitre, but the volatile and erratic AJ Burnett), that role looks to be more important than ever this year. After all, the back end of the pen is solid. The middle looks solid – but all six of the guys the team is counting on will wilt in the second half if they’re logging 1/2 of the teams innings.

The argument against Joba starting boils down to two problems: first, how healthy is his shoulder? Second, will he ever display the consistency to be effective over 7+ innings every five days – or is he more of an AJ-lite?

As to the question of health, we’ll never know unless Joba is returned to the rotation, it seems. Last year, his average fastball clocked in around 94-95mph, ending a three year decline in velocity. But, Joba also threw fewer pitches than in any full-season – 30% fewer. Was the increased velocity the result of a lighter workload not taxing that injured shoulder? If returned to the rotation, how will tripling his pitch count affect his velocity and control? (Statistics courtesy of Fangraphs)

The maturity question is another one that’s hard to gauge at this point. If it’s true that being bounced around from one role to another makes a pitcher great, then Joba should be ready to become the next Bob Gibson. But all the evidence thus far points to pitcher who has difficulty controlling his emotions, which is the principle reason he was relegated to the pen in the first place.

Of course, the Yankees could sign a back-of-the-rotation type over the next 4 weeks (Justin Duchsherer, perhaps?), relegating Mitre back to the pen or Nova back to the minors and rendering the whole question moot.

For now.

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Part 2 of 2

Yesterday, I went in depth into comparing Derek Jeter‘s value, based solely on performance. But as discussed, Jeter’s true value to the Yankees doesn’t end with his performance; it only begins there. I noted how even Yankee GM Brian Cashman has favorably compared Jeter to Lou Gehrig. Just to muck up the water some more, both Cashman and Hal Steinbrenner have alluded to Jeter’s iconic status during these contract negotiations.

Based on yesterday’s statistical analysis of how much a player of Jeter’s ability can honestly expect to receive, I came to the conclusion that on the open market Jeter should anticipate an annual contract value between $12 and $12.6 million; but if paid on the scale that the Yankees have traditionally paid players of his ability, then he could expect an annual contract worth $17.7 million. Based on those numbers, the Yankees reported $45 million, 3 year offer is reasonable and a good point for beginning negotiations. The main point of contention is how much is that Derek Jeter/New York Yankees relationship worth to each side?

Unfortunately, we don’t really have a great way to statistically analyze that number. The Yankees are not a public corporation, so we can’t peer into their financials to see how much Jeter has meant to the team in strictly a dollars and cents way – nor do we have access to their revenue projections, and you can bet that Derek Jeter merchandising and PR is part of those numbers. But we can take an educated guess at how much value the Yankees have placed on the relationship in the past.

For starters, look at what we do know about the team’s finances and how they’ve paid Jeter over his career. The last year before Jeter joined the Yankees, they drew 1.7 million fans into Yankee Stadium, good for 7th in the American League. Team payroll in 1995 was $11,623,500 and the franchise’s net worth was around $580 million. In Jeter’s first year, 2,250,877 people filed into Yankee Stadium (still only 7th in attendance, though) and the franchise value was around $600 million. Fast forward to 2010: the team’s attendance last year was 3,765,807 (the top draw in baseball for the 7th time in the past 8 seasons). In fact, over the past ten seasons, the Yankees have drawn 3.5 million more fans than the next closest team, the Dodgers. Forbes reports that the Yankees franchise was worth around $1.6 billion at the beginning of the season and recognized a 7% increase in value from 2009. In a nutshell, Jeter’s Yankees have tripled in value, along with annual attendance figures. Before Jeter, the Yankees were a middling team in terms of payroll, franchise value and attendance. They were also perennial cellar-dwellers in the standings, with only two winning seasons in the previous 7. Since his arrival, the Yankees have dominated baseball financially the same way as the dynasty teams of the 40’s and 50’s – and have turned into perennial pennant contenders. (It should be noted that the Yankees threw that monetary weight around back then, too – the current era is not the only one when the team is accused of “buying championships.”)

It is an undeniable fact that the partnership of Jeter and the Yankees has worked out well for both teams. The question remains, though, how much of the teams financial success is directly attributable to number 2? We don’t have a way to measure that, per se, although there are sabermatricians out there working on developing models. We can, though, get an idea on how much the Yankees value Jeter’s contributions to the overall financial well-being of the franchise. How? By comparing Jeter’s last contract with those of his peers from that time.

Yesterday, I charted player’s salaries vs. their WAR over the past 5 seasons to determine Jeter’s present value, based on performance. The same can be done for when Jeter signed his last contract, in 2000:

1996-2001

2001

Amount overpaid

Rk Player

WAR/pos

$/WAR

1 Alex Rodriguez

37.8

$ 2,910,052.91 $ 1,250,254.33
2 Jeff Bagwell

36.3

$ 895,316.80 $ (764,481.77)
3 Mike Piazza

31.1

$ 2,181,901.77 $ 522,103.19
4 Chipper Jones

30.0

$ 1,722,222.17 $ 62,423.59
5 Ivan Rodriguez

29.4

$ 1,394,557.82 $ (265,240.75)
6 Mark McGwire

28.6

$ 1,923,076.92 $ 263,278.35
7 Craig Biggio

28.0

$ 1,383,928.57 $ (275,870.00)
8 Derek Jeter

27.4

$ 2,299,270.07 $ 639,471.50
9 Nomar Garciaparra

27.0

$ 1,342,592.59 $ (317,205.98)
10 Roberto Alomar

24.9

$ 1,556,224.90 $ (103,573.68)
11 John Olerud

24.0

$ 1,395,833.33 $ (263,965.24)
12 Barry Larkin

23.8

$ 1,890,756.30 $ 230,957.73
13 Jim Thome

23.6

$ 1,668,432.20 $ 8,633.63
14 Jeff Kent

23.3

$ 1,287,553.65 $ (372,244.93)
15 Jeff Cirillo

23.2

$ 1,045,258.62 $ (614,539.96)

Chart 1: MLB Top 15 players 1996-2000

Jeter was, when compared to his peers a decade ago, paid a $639,471 “bonus” vs. the MLB average in WAR dollars. Let’s assume that Jeter is, in terms of being a commodity, worth a similar amount today and factor in inflation – the $639,471 2001 dollars would be equal to $663,898, using the US Government’s inflation calculator.

So, by adding his value in terms of performance and what both player and team agreed to as his marketing and PR value a decade ago, you arrive at this:

Derek Jeter’s 2011 contract should be between $12.6 million and $18.3 million.

Well, there you have it. Let us know what you think!

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Part 1 of 2


The principle topic of discussion in Yankeeland for the past week has been, how much should Derek Jeter make on his next contract? The debate has raged on since Sunday, when details began leaking of the Yankees $45 million, 3 year offer and Casey Close’s “bafflement.” Yesterday, I saw a bunch of tweets about Jeter asking for 6 years and $150 million. I don’t know where those rumors started, but I also saw a bunch from Close stating those figures were “rubbish.” I’m also hearing that the $15 million average salary offered to Jeter represents a number perhaps twice his true market value, which sounds like so much rubbish to me. But before I start tossing around opinions, I thought I would do a little research into the matter.

The central questions to all of this tug-and-pull remains what, exactly, is Jeter’s worth to the open market and what is his worth to the Yankees? I think pretty much everyone with a little common sense understands that Jeter is for more valuable to the Yankees than to any other team and for the Yankees to pay him based strictly on what he is worth to, say, the Giants is ridiculous. And Jeter would be just as ridiculous to expect the same type of money from the Giants as he would from the Yankees. Harvey Araton of the NY Times has a good article today in which none other than Brian Cashman compares Jeter to Lou Gehrig. Like Gehrig, Jeter is a for more valuable commodity to the Yankees than to any other team.

So what is Jeter’s worth?

To start, I looked at what a typical major league team pays for players of Jeter’s caliber. By using WAR, we can determine how much a player is paid based on how many wins he is better than a typical replacement:

2011

2011

Rk Player

WAR

Salary

$/WAR

1 Albert Pujols

42.6

$ 16,000,000.00 $ 1,877,934.27
2 Joe Mauer

33.8

$ 23,000,000.00 $ 3,402,366.86
3 Chase Utley

30.8

$ 15,000,000.00 $ 2,435,064.94
4 Hanley Ramirez

29.1

$ 11,000,000.00 $ 1,890,034.36
5 Alex Rodriguez

26.3

$ 31,000,000.00 $ 5,893,536.12
6 Mark Teixeira

26.2

$ 22,500,000.00 $ 4,293,893.13
7 Miguel Cabrera

24.9

$ 20,000,000.00 $ 4,016,064.26
8 David Wright

24.8

$ 14,000,000.00 $ 2,822,580.65
9 Chipper Jones

24.1

$ 13,000,000.00 $ 2,697,095.44
10 Kevin Youkilis

23.2

$ 12,000,000.00 $ 2,586,206.90
11 Adrian Gonzalez

22.9

$ 5,500,000.00 $ 1,200,873.36
12 Robinson Cano

22.1

$ 10,000,000.00 $ 2,262,443.44
13 Derek Jeter

21.4

$ –
14 Justin Morneau

19.8

$ 14,000,000.00 $ 3,535,353.54
15 Jose Reyes

19.4

$ 11,000,000.00 $ 2,835,051.55
ML Average –> $ 2,945,945.95

First up, Derek Jeter is the 13th most productive player in all of MLB since 2006. I think that lost in all of the acrimony and discussion of how bad Jeter was last year is that simple fact – only 12 players in MLB have been more productive than Derek Jeter. That’s pretty amazing, if you consider that more than 600 individuals have donned a major league uniform over that time. (I went back 5 seasons, so as to get a representative sample). You’ll also notice that even with some horrendously underpaid performers (Hanley Ramirez and Adrian Gonzalez) in the top 15, the average compensation per win in 2011 is nearly $3 million. Using that figure as a yardstick, fair compensation for Jeter – based solely on performance – would be his WAR dollar value of $12,608,648.65. If you were to pay him based on WAR dollar value of players at similar ages/careers, then the number drops slightly to $12,096,338.26 – or, to put it another way, teams realize players of Jeter’s age probably won’t continue to produce like they did when they were 30 and the average “age discount” is roughly $510,000. Also, you can see that there are four Yankees in the top fifteen: besides Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira and Robinson Cano. Their average compensation per win in 2011 is $4,149,976.76 – if Jeter were paid on the Yankee scale, then his value would be $17,761,818.37.

All of a sudden, that $15 million figure offered by Cashman doesn’t represent a number that far from Jeter’s value based on performance. Best case for Cashman, they’re offering Jeter a $3 million bonus. Worst case, the offer represents shortchanging Jeter by about $2.5 million. Based strictly on performance, the two sides probably could come to a pretty quick accommodation. But the principle sticking point in this negotiation is that Jeter is worth far more to the Yankees than to any of the other 31 teams in baseball. Jeter knows it. Cashman knows it. The obvious problem is coming to an agreement on just how much value Jeter represents to the Yankees vs. other teams. Or, to put it in Cashman’s own words, how much this century’s Gehrig is worth to the Yankees.

There really isn’t any way to statistically analyze that number. Since the Yankees are not a public corporation, we don’t have access to their financials, nor do we have access for their revenue projections for the next 5 years. But we can make an educated guess.

And I’ll discuss that tomorrow.

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The Basball Writers Association has spoken. In their opinion, Robbie Cano is only the third most valuable player in the American League.

I’m still trying to decipher why Robbie only finished third – and a distant third, at that. Hamilton (.359, 32, 100) and Cabrera (.328, 38,126) both had great individual seasons. But apparently, the BBWAA forgot the meaning of “valuable.”

Otherwise, how does a player whose team finished 13 games out of first place finish second?

How does a player who missed almost the entire month of September finish first?

And how does Jose Bautista, whose team finished in fourth, get a first-place vote but Robbie Cano doesn’t get any?

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